reject

/rɪˈʤɛkt/

  • Verb
  • to refuse to believe, accept, or consider (something)
    1. My teacher rejected my excuse for being late.
    2. The committee rejected my proposal/idea/suggestion/motion.
    3. I agree with several points of her argument, while rejecting [=disagreeing with] her conclusions.
    4. She rejected the package/letter [=she did not accept the delivery of the package, letter, etc.] and returned it unopened.
  • to decide not to publish (something) or make (something) available to the public because it is not good enough
    1. My article/book/paper was rejected.
    2. The produce inspector rejected several crates of berries that had begun to grow mold.
  • to refuse to allow (someone) to join a club, to attend a school, etc.
    1. The college rejects hundreds of applicants each year.
  • to decide not to offer (someone) a job or position
    1. We rejected 5 of the 10 job applicants right away.
  • to refuse to love, care for, or give attention to (someone)
    1. The mother cat rejected the smallest kitten and refused to feed it.
    2. Rejected by society, these street kids have to fend for themselves.
    3. He still loves her even though she's rejected him before.
    4. He wanted to ask her on a date, but he was afraid of being rejected.
  • to produce substances that try to harm or destroy (a transplanted organ, a skin graft, etc.)
    1. The patient's immune system rejected the transplanted heart. = The patient rejected the transplanted heart.
  • Noun
  • something that is not good enough for some purpose
    1. Stack the promising applications here, and put the rejects over there.
    2. One way to save on clothing costs is to buy (factory) rejects. [=clothes that are sold for a lower price because they have flaws]
  • a person who is not accepted or liked by other people
    1. the rejects of society = society's rejects
    2. (informal) Ignore him, he's a (total/complete) reject.